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Tue Nov 13, 2012, 12:19 PM

More say that congressional Republicans would be more to blame than President Obama (53% vs. 29%).

http://www.people-press.org/2012/11/13/broad-concern-about-fiscal-cliff-consequences/

As the president and congressional leaders begin negotiations to avoid the “fiscal cliff” deadline at the end of the year, there is widespread public concern about the possible financial consequences. More say the automatic spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to take effect in January would have a major effect on the U.S. economy than on their own finances. But nearly identical majorities say the effect of the changes would be mostly negative for the economy (62%) and their personal financial situation (60%).

The public is skeptical that President Obama and congressional Republicans will reach an agreement by the end of the year to avoid the fiscal cliff. About half (51%) say the two sides will not reach an agreement, while just 38% say they will. If no deal is reached, more say that congressional Republicans would be more to blame than President Obama (53% vs. 29%).

The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post, conducted Nov. 8-11, 2012, among 1,000 adults finds sharp partisan divisions over prospects for a deal to avoid the fiscal measures from automatically taking effect.

Republicans are particularly skeptical: By a 66%-25% margin more think an agreement will not be reached. By comparison, Democrats are about as likely to expect a deal to be made (47%), as not (40%). Among independents, 51% do not think President Obama and Republicans and in Congress will come to an agreement, while 37% think this will happen.

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Reply More say that congressional Republicans would be more to blame than President Obama (53% vs. 29%). (Original post)
Guy Whitey Corngood Nov 2012 OP
BlueCaliDem Nov 2012 #1
grahamhgreen Nov 2012 #2
Hutzpa Nov 2012 #3
AnotherMcIntosh Nov 2012 #4
humbled_opinion Nov 2012 #5
grahamhgreen Nov 2012 #8
humbled_opinion Nov 2012 #11
Chakab Nov 2012 #6
JoeyT Nov 2012 #9
zbdent Nov 2012 #7
Guy Whitey Corngood Nov 2012 #10
Eddie Haskell Nov 2012 #12
texpatriot2004 Nov 2012 #13
democrattotheend Nov 2012 #14

Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 12:31 PM

1. It's good that the majority of the public will blame the Republicans, not President Obama

should no deal be reached by the end of the year.

This is positive news. Finally, Congress, specifically, congressional Republicans will be held to account for a possible gridlock.

The president was given a mandate by the American people by a WIDE margin in both the EC and popular vote. He worked hard for and earned political capital, and he MUST use it to benefit all the people, rather than the 1% because the 1% did not vote for him en masse. The people did. I believe he'll remember who brung him and do the right thing.

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Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 12:39 PM

2. There is no fiscal cliff. It is deficit reduction.

I don't think we should use their framing.

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Response to grahamhgreen (Reply #2)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 12:46 PM

3. I agree

I don't understand why democrats are using the republican terminology on this.

IT IS DEFICIT REDUCTION. Lets stop using their terminology because this is how they use their weakness and turn it into strong points by using simple semantics.

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Response to grahamhgreen (Reply #2)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 12:47 PM

4. x2

 

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Response to grahamhgreen (Reply #2)


Response to humbled_opinion (Reply #5)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 08:55 PM

8. Not according to the CBO -

"Under current law, the federal budget deficit will fall dra-
matically between 2012 and 2013 owing to scheduled
increases in taxes and, to a lesser extent, scheduled reduc-
tions in spending—a development that some observers
have referred to as a “fiscal cliff.”


The recent or scheduled
expirations of tax provisions, such as those that lower
income and payroll tax rates and limit the reach of the
alternative minimum tax (AMT), will boost tax revenues
considerably in 2013 compared with the sums that will
be collected in 2012. The automatic enforcement proce-
dures established in the Budget Control Act of 2011
(Public Law 112-25) will lower spending in 2013
deficit by 5.1 percent of GDP between calendar years
2012 and 2013 (with the resulting economic feedback
included, the reduction will be smaller).

Under those fiscal conditions, which will occur under
current law, growth in real (inflation-adjusted) GDP in
calendar year 2013 will be just 0.5 percent, CBO"

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&ved=0CEAQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cbo.gov%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fcbofiles%2Fattachments%2FFiscalRestraint_0.pdf&ei=9PaiUPKUNuOQiAK364DYDA&usg=AFQjCNEfZjSWpAV7AuwPmxkUx5Gicu3STg


Of course, in the end, any serious deficit hawk knows that the fastest way to eliminate the debt and deficit is to return to the tax policies of the greatest generation.

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Response to grahamhgreen (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 05:06 PM

11. Seriously?

"CURRENT LAW" and no one is even considering allowing the tax cuts to expire completely which is what this CBO data is based on. The revenue received from the tax increase on the 250K and above crowd will not be nearly enough to seriously lower the deficits, on top of that you would have to believe that somehow tax increases on those making over 250K is going to somehow translate into more economic growth, that is simply a false assumption with no historical data to prove it would happen.

Truthfully I wouldn't be surprised if the economy didn't need an additional stimulus boost next year and of course stimulant is deficit.

My point is that this country faces a serious economic problem, there is no simple answer and all we can do is hope that somehow someone gets control over it.... The bottom line is this is going to HURT, how bad it hurts depends on how drastic the government responds to the debt.

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Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 07:25 PM

6. Those are great numbers for Obama.

There's always about 30% on the wrong side of polling in every issue. The pretty much his ceiling in the public perception game.

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Response to Chakab (Reply #6)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 07:16 AM

9. Yep.

Same 30% that thought Bush the Lesser was doing a fine job as president in 2007.

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Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Tue Nov 13, 2012, 08:26 PM

7. Obama and Boner had an agreement, that Boner worked out with Obama ...

and then, he went back, was threatened by the nutjobs, or bribed, and then went in front of the national cameras and said that OBAMA experienced a failure in LEADERSHIP ...

(what, when you can't get YOUR OWN PEOPLE TO AGREE with what YOU agreed to, it's Obama's fault???)

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Response to zbdent (Reply #7)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 11:28 AM

10. I know. I was so hopeful his drunken over tanned insurance industry check giving

ass would become the minority leader.

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Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 05:21 PM

12. I'm beginning to hate these people.

I support expiration before negotiation.

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Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 07:50 PM

13. It would definitely be the Republicans

Fault. The party of no, the obstructionists.

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Response to Guy Whitey Corngood (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 07:55 PM

14. I still don't want it to happen

I don't want to see people suffer more economically than they already have in the last several years. Things are just starting to turn around and I don't want to jeopardize that. Maybe it would achieve better policy outcomes in the long run, but tell that to the people who have been struggling and were just starting to hope again.

I admit I have a personal stake in this, as a law student hoping to work for the government. But I can't help but think that if law students and lawyers would be hit hard by a government hiring freeze/cuts, a lot of lower-income people in many industries will be hit a lot harder.

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