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Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:05 PM

Welcome to the Post Election Friday Afternoon Challenge, DUers! Today: “Reinventing Rome.” *

The architecture of Rome has had enduring influence on many later structures in other countries. Here are 5 examples of the original edifices and their reinventions for you to identify.

And, as always, please play fair...

*Special thanks/credit to Professor Kathleen Curran, Trinity College, for the fine lecture that inspired this Challenge!


1a.


1b.


2a.


2.b.


3a.


3b.


4a.


4b.


5a.


5b.

43 replies, 2244 views

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Arrow 43 replies Author Time Post
Reply Welcome to the Post Election Friday Afternoon Challenge, DUers! Today: “Reinventing Rome.” * (Original post)
CTyankee Nov 2012 OP
CTyankee Nov 2012 #1
Suich Nov 2012 #2
CTyankee Nov 2012 #3
Suich Nov 2012 #11
CTyankee Nov 2012 #14
hfojvt Nov 2012 #4
CTyankee Nov 2012 #5
CTyankee Nov 2012 #34
hfojvt Nov 2012 #6
CTyankee Nov 2012 #7
CTyankee Nov 2012 #8
Spider Jerusalem Nov 2012 #9
CTyankee Nov 2012 #13
Spider Jerusalem Nov 2012 #15
CTyankee Nov 2012 #16
Spider Jerusalem Nov 2012 #20
CTyankee Nov 2012 #28
JackRiddler Nov 2012 #10
CTyankee Nov 2012 #12
surrealAmerican Nov 2012 #17
CTyankee Nov 2012 #22
Starboard Tack Nov 2012 #19
CTyankee Nov 2012 #25
JackRiddler Nov 2012 #29
CTyankee Nov 2012 #32
Starboard Tack Nov 2012 #18
CTyankee Nov 2012 #23
wickerwoman Nov 2012 #21
CTyankee Nov 2012 #24
CTyankee Nov 2012 #26
CTyankee Nov 2012 #27
JackRiddler Nov 2012 #30
CTyankee Nov 2012 #31
JackRiddler Nov 2012 #35
CTyankee Nov 2012 #36
JackRiddler Nov 2012 #37
CTyankee Nov 2012 #38
CTyankee Nov 2012 #33
Odin2005 Nov 2012 #39
CTyankee Nov 2012 #40
Odin2005 Nov 2012 #41
Bucky Nov 2012 #42
CTyankee Nov 2012 #43

Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:32 PM

1. A kick to get the conversation started...hope you can join in!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:39 PM

2. 1b is Monticello n/t

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Response to Suich (Reply #2)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:40 PM

3. Excellent! And its predecessor (1a)?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #3)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:11 PM

11. No idea!

I totally enjoy your Friday quizzes, CTYankee, but I really really suck at them!

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Response to Suich (Reply #11)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:19 PM

14. Well, this one is pretty hard...I didn't go easy on you guys...sorry, my bad...

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Response to Suich (Reply #2)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:45 PM

4. that's what I thought

and 2b sorta could be the Lincoln Memorial?

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Response to hfojvt (Reply #4)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:47 PM

5. No, but you are in the right country...

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Response to hfojvt (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 10:28 AM

34. please see my MAJOR CORRECTION on 2b. I apologize to you and everyone else who

joined in for this major booboo on my part, which I discovered late last night.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:49 PM

6. 4b was reminding me of the Capitol in Topeka

close, but no cigar

edit, that is one hell of a link, I guess others will have to google for themselves

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Response to hfojvt (Reply #6)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 05:51 PM

7. not the capitol in Topeka...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:02 PM

8. HINT: Reinventions in this thread are in 3 countries outside of Italy...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:02 PM

9. 4b: Wisconsin State Capitol building in Madison

5b: the July Column in the Place de la Bastille in Paris

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Response to Spider Jerusalem (Reply #9)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:18 PM

13. No on both...sorry...it looks like 4a set a template for lotsa places...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #13)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:21 PM

15. then 5b is the Vendome Column in the Place Vendome

(tricolour flags make it definitely one or the other; process of elimination)

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Response to Spider Jerusalem (Reply #15)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:26 PM

16. Well, then, of course! And, its predecessor? and where is the tricolor flag? Or did you just know it

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #16)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:36 PM

20. 4b, I have no idea

it's similar to the US Capitol, and to the dome of St Paul's in London, and to dozens of other cathedrals and state capitol buildings on more or less the same pattern...looking closer that looks like a cross, though, so I'll guess it's a cathedral, at least.

Edit: and the French tricolour is visible on the left side of the column at the top hanging from the railing.

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Response to Spider Jerusalem (Reply #20)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:50 PM

28. So what is the "template" for this design? (hint, hint)

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:03 PM

10. 3b -

Grand Central Terminal?!

No, silly me, but it's a train station in grand style.

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Response to JackRiddler (Reply #10)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:15 PM

12. Not Grand Central Station...but...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #12)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:29 PM

17. Is it Union Station in Chicago?

It looks soooo familiar.

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Response to surrealAmerican (Reply #17)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:32 PM

22. I think lots of them in that era did look that way but this one is very special for a reason...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #12)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:36 PM

19. Union Station, Los Angeles?

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Response to Starboard Tack (Reply #19)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:34 PM

25. No, sorry...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #12)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 10:27 PM

29. Of course, it's Penn Station

The real Penn Station, the one demolished in 1962. Unbelievable! Still a shocking crime against history & architecture.

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Response to JackRiddler (Reply #29)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 01:35 AM

32. An amazing building, yes.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:35 PM

18. 4b, I think, is St. Pauls Cathedral, London

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Response to Starboard Tack (Reply #18)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:32 PM

23. You are right!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 06:45 PM

21. I'll take a stab at some.

1a. Not sure
1b. Monticello
2a. The Pantheon?
2b. Part of the Library of Congress- is that where the Constitution is kept?
3a. St Peter's Basillica?
3b. National Cathedral?
4a. Don't know
4b. Don't know
5a. Trajan's Column
5b. Looks like Paris- not sure of the name of the column though

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Response to wickerwoman (Reply #21)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:34 PM

24. you are right with 1b., 5a, and 5b...

and GOOD for you!!!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)


Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:45 PM

27. HINT: the Romans really liked to hang out in this kind of place in 3a....

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #27)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 10:28 PM

30. That would mean a forum or a bath

It's the Forum in Rome? Was it really that tall? (Yeh, I guess the Pantheon was that tall, why not the Forum.)

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Response to JackRiddler (Reply #30)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 01:31 AM

31. No, it is a bath.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #31)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 11:00 AM

35. So it's the Grand Central Bath House in Rome!

Well, no, I don't know but that's a BIG bath house!

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Response to JackRiddler (Reply #35)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 11:05 AM

36. Altho I learned the answer thru the Prof.'s lecture, I also googled it and it popped right up.

So I thought that anyone who got Old Penn Station could also find the connection to this particular Roman Bath...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #36)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 12:51 PM

37. How true. I was lazy and went for the one-liner...

instead of one single google search:

roman bath house penn station

Leading to:

Main Waiting Room, modeled after the Roman baths of Caracalla
http://pennstationdoc.com/pennstationdoc.com/Story.html

So it's the Roman baths of Caracalla!

Lazy people (as I've proven to be) let Wikipedia do the talking:

The Baths of Caracalla (Italian: Terme di Caracalla) in Rome, Italy were Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between AD 212 and 216, during the reign of the Emperor Caracalla. Chris Scarre provides a slightly longer construction period 211-217 AD. They would have had to install over 2,000 tons of material every day for 6 years in order to complete it in this time period. Records show that the idea for the baths were drawn up by Septimius Severus, and merely completed or opened in the lifetime of Caracalla. This would allow for a longer construction timeframe. They are today a tourist attraction.

*snip*

The baths remained in use until the 6th century when the complex was taken by the Ostrogoths during the Gothic War, at which time the hydraulic installations were destroyed. The bath was free and open to the public. The building was heated by a hypocaust, a system of burning coal and wood underneath the ground to heat water provided by a dedicated aqueduct. It was in use up to the 19th century. The Aqua Marcia aqueduct by Caracalla was specifically built to serve the baths. It was most likely reconstructed by Garbrecht and Manderscheid to its current place.

In the 19th and early 20th century, the design of the baths was used as the inspiration for several modern structures, including St George's Hall, Liverpool and Pennsylvania Station in New York City. At the 1960 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the gymnastics events.


See the bolded sentence? How much futher along are we?

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Response to JackRiddler (Reply #37)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 03:04 PM

38. Wow, you did your homework+++!

I didn't get THAT much!

I'll post answers later...just got back from the Yale Bowl watching Yale lose ignominiously once again this season...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 09:15 AM

33. AACK! MAJOR CORRECTION ON THE FRIDAY CHALLENGE!

2b. SHOULD be this:



My apologies for the screw-up!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 03:40 PM

39. 5a is Trajan's Collumn.

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #39)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 04:17 PM

40. Yep. Have you identified any others?

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #40)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 09:08 PM

41. I recognized Montecello, but not the rest.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 11:56 PM

42. Beautiful. The American Founders intentionally mimicked the Roman Republic

The legacy and the ultimate fate of the Roman Republic served as an inspiration and a looming caveat to the Founding Fathers. Washington consciously crafted his image after Cincinnatus. They all warned posterity against Caesarism. James Madison was convinced a Gracchus-like demagogue would come along and upset the apple cart if the elites (he called them "First Characters") ever became too stratified & corrupt. Jefferson expected a revolution to occur every generation. You can't understand the early American republic without understanding Rome.

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Response to Bucky (Reply #42)

Sun Nov 11, 2012, 12:08 AM

43. I had a terrific course in grad school called "Virtue, Self Interest and the Origins of the American

Republic," that discussed just this concern: that of the republic ending up an empire. The Louisiana Purchase was Jefferson's idea of forestalling this occurrence with extension through land acquisition what could not be overcome in time. He was right, of course, the Republic did become an empire. We studied the period of time between the ratification of the Constitution and the Jackson era, roughly 50 years.

There was also a concern at that time with what was happening in Europe with the rise of Napoleon. And rightly so, given his success in taking over so much of the Continent.

This was also a very interesting time in our society with regard to social history of that time. Their notions about virtue and self control (that included a successful temperance movement (of particular interest because of the Industrial Revolution) and even the fertility rates!

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