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Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:51 PM

Things Change.

Today, I carried a 32" CRT television set down to the basement. The thing weighed almost 100 lb. My wife's aunt, who passed away not long ago, named us to receive her LCD HD television. It's just a 26" model, but that's no matter. What struck me was the difference...the change...between the bulk and heft of the two devices, not to mention the dramatic improvement in the technology. I even hooked up rabbit ears to it, and let it find all the local digital channels here in the Twin Cities in MN. 21 of them, in all. I haven't received TV over the air since the 1970s. We won't use that capability unless the cable's out, but it's cool, anyhow.

Things change. Who could have imagined a high-definition LCD television in the 70s? Who could have imagined, at the same time, a black man as the President of the United States? Who could have imagined that LGBT couples would be able to marry in several states, with more to come, or that a gay man or lesbian woman could openly serve in our military?

So, we have all those things today, in 2012. I'm a lot older than I was in the 1970s...older than I care to think about, frankly. I've seen a lot of things change. I could not have imagined posting on DU then. I could not imagine that we'd be watching data come back from Mars that might indicate that life could have existed there. When I was in High School, in the early 1960s, contraceptives were illegal in California for unmarried people, and girls in my class had to sneak around to have a safe abortion. Fortunately, there was a kind doctor in the small town I grew up in who would do them if you knew that he would.

We have a black President, for pete's sake, and he's almost certain to win a second term. The old angry white men are my age or older now, and they'll soon be dead, as I will, I suppose. The young people who are new voters don't have the same crap in their heads. They think nothing of electing a black man to the Presidency, and can't imagine why LGBT people shouldn't marry if they want to.

Things change. They will continue to change. Things will go up and down, and there will be good times and bad times. The trend, however, is positive. Many things are better today than they were in the past, and there's promise that they'll continue to get better.

I'm an old fart, but I'm still an optimist. I've seen lots of crappy stuff since I was born, and I've seen a lot of that crappy stuff go away. There was a huge polio scare when I was 5 years old. Polio isn't scary any more. We have medical technology that can give an 86 year old man new hips so he can still work on his tractor. He shouldn't, but that's his life, and he does. He's my dad, and he's 88 now. My mother, who is also 88, got a stent in a cardiac artery a couple of weeks ago, and is back out pruning her rose bushes. All covered by Medicare. They'd have been dead had they been that age just 40 years ago. No question.

Things change. I've seen them change for the better. I believe that will continue into the future.

GOTV 2012, everyone!

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:52 PM

1. Hear hear!

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:53 PM

2. Because you're in Minnesota, I thought you were referencing this video.

David Blankenhorn -- yes, THAT David Blankenhorn -- urges Minnesotans not to enshrine bigotry in the state constitution.



Change happens -- GOTMFV!

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Response to Brickbat (Reply #2)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:56 PM

3. Thanks for the video. I hadn't seen it yet.

Yes, I'm very optimistic that the anti-marriage amendment will fail. I've been working on that in my own precinct as I talk to voters.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:58 PM

4. A great read. nt

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Response to msanthrope (Reply #4)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:59 PM

5. You're too kind, by half.

Thanks.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #5)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:06 PM

7. I've never been accused of being kind on this board! You are welcome! nt

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:03 PM

6. You're right as rain. I've seen the same changes...sometimes I try to imagine the changes

my grandparents saw..they were born in the late 1890s and gramma died in the 1990s. Almost unimaginable the changes they saw.
We haven't seen as many, but we've seen a lot.

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Response to shraby (Reply #6)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:07 PM

9. Absolutely. My maternal grandmother

was also born in the 1890s. I used to love sitting and asking her questions about her life when she was young. It was amazing. She remembers the first time she saw a light bulb in her little town in Arizona. She remembered seeing her first automobile and listening to a radio for the first time. It was my first glimpse into real human history. Her husband, my grandfather, fought in the Spanish-American war. It many ways, it's fun being old. You get to know things that younger folks don't, in terms of history.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:06 PM

8. "Who could have imagined a high-definition LCD television in the 70s?"

Star Trek, for one.

New fallacies replace old ones but they're still fallacies.

People like fallacies because they're simple, require little brainpower, and so they will always be with us.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:08 PM

10. You're right, things change, especially our military from 1917

at least we hope that things have changed since 1917.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #10)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:09 PM

11. Indeed.

Everything changes.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:12 PM

12. Even 20 years ago, in 1992, it would have been hard to imagine something like an iPhone.

Remember the early cell phones, which were the size of bricks? All you could do with them is make phone calls, and not always reliably. I got a cell phone in the early '90s and thought it was the coolest, modernest thing ever. The iPhone makes that old thing look positively Pleistocene.

The Internet was just getting off the ground at that time for ordinary commercial use - anybody remember Gopher? Netscape Navigator? I got an email account in about 1996 but it was cumbersome and I didn't use it much. Now we do everything by email. I knew a guy who was trying to start a business selling a product over the Internet but it was really clumsy and operated through a sort of email system - this was just before Netscape came into common use - and it never went anywhere. Once I started using Netscape I thought it was totally awesome even though all we could get was dial-up service and it was slow as molasses. That technology has changed so dramatically in just a few years.

The faster things change the faster they continue to change. Some changes are not good - obviously, climate change is a very disturbing consequence of human activities - but I remain hopeful that we won't fuck up the world. But I am also kind of old, and I probably won't live to find out how that comes out. I do hope I live long enough to see continuing progress in civil rights, and that better technology can be used to fix some of the things that aren't working. In any event, nothing ever stays the same. Sometimes I feel like I'm just along for the ride.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #12)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 10:12 PM

14. Well let's see...

I got online in 1994 using a Commodore Amiga. I logged on to a local service - still around - here in NYC. Its called ECHO. I used a browser called iBrowse. It all seems like ages ago now.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:16 PM

13. Adjusted minimum wage should be about $20 an hour n/t

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 10:18 PM

15. You don't have to be an optimist to know that, on balance, the world is better than it was.

Nice post.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 10:18 PM

16. Denialists have always thought that way.

Denialism is as old as mankind. It is a coping mechanism.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denialism

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