HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » What happened to Canada's...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:33 PM

What happened to Canada's Boreal Forests:



15 replies, 1550 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 15 replies Author Time Post
Reply What happened to Canada's Boreal Forests: (Original post)
CaliforniaPeggy Oct 2012 OP
struggle4progress Oct 2012 #1
CaliforniaPeggy Oct 2012 #3
SunSeeker Oct 2012 #2
Electric Monk Oct 2012 #4
Laura PourMeADrink Oct 2012 #5
amborin Oct 2012 #6
CaliforniaPeggy Oct 2012 #7
WCGreen Oct 2012 #8
limpyhobbler Oct 2012 #9
CaliforniaPeggy Oct 2012 #10
countryjake Oct 2012 #11
Zorra Oct 2012 #12
CaliforniaPeggy Oct 2012 #13
AverageJoe90 Oct 2012 #14
CaliforniaPeggy Oct 2012 #15

Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:35 PM

1. What a perfect way to welcome global warming! Cut down still more living forests so we can extract

and burn still more fossil carbon

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to struggle4progress (Reply #1)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:37 PM

3. Exactly right.

It is sickening.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:36 PM

2. Like the bleached bones of the dead forest.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:38 PM

4. “I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees. I speak for the trees for the trees have no tongues.”

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.”

― Dr. Seuss, The Lorax

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:41 PM

5. Sad and sickening

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:44 PM

6. Canada's Boreal is more import than the Amazon & summer destination for north & south Am migrating b

irds

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to amborin (Reply #6)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 09:51 PM

7. True that.

But in the end, it didn't matter to the Keystone Pipeline folks.

What they don't know is when the migrating birds lose their homes...eventually, so do we.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 10:08 PM

8. Very stark....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 10:32 PM

9. ooh wow. they are planning on doing this to an area the size of NY state or bigger.

Here is what it looks like later:

http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/eshope/women_fighting_tar_sands_acros.html


Women Fighting Tar Sands Across North America

Last week, an all-female delegation led by 1997 Nobel Peace Prize winner and Nobel Women’s Initiative Chair Jody Williams set out to Alberta and British Columbia in an effort to learn about the impacts of tar sands oil extraction and pipeline and tanker projects on women and their communities. Williams was joined by a group of women from the United States, Canada and Kenya who are all leaders in their work on environmental, social justice, and tribal issues. The delegation met with over 200 women from 13 communities, including Fort McMurray, Burns Lake Fort McKay, Prince George, Smithers, Terrace and Kitimat. They also met with aboriginal community leaders from the Nadleh Wu’ten and the Saik’uz Nations, and government and oil industry representatives – listening, learning, and bringing attention to how tar sands are affecting the lives of women and their communities in Western Canada. They heard how these communities have faced contaminated water, increased health issues, and communities divided by issues of poverty and the fear of speaking out against the oil industry. Women and communities across the continent stand to be affected by the climate change, air pollution, water pollution, and pipeline and tanker spills that tar sands expansion would cause. Many are becoming community leaders and raising their voices against tar sands.

The tar sands underlie an area of the Boreal forest approximately the size of Florida; to date, tar sands mining has caused the creation of 65 square miles of toxic waste lakes, which are leaching 3 million gallons per day into the Athabasca River and watershed. First Nation communities have inhabited these regions for generations, with hunting, fishing and trapping playing a major component of their livelihoods. But in recent years, communities downstream from the tar sands have seen major changes in their land, water and communities alongside the growth of tar sands extraction: an abnormal number of fish with strange tumors, high rates of rare cancers. People in Alberta are worried. In a trip blog by Jody Williams, she writes:

I keep thinking about all the women we have met with who talk about all the breathing problems of the children in the communities… I keep hearing the voices of the women who said, ‘You can’t eat money and once our territory is ruined, we can’t get it back. Once our water is gone, we can’t get it back.’

Despite fear of the tar sands industry, people are fighting. Crystal Lameman of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation addressed the delegation about what her community is doing to fight for their rights and livelihood: The Beaver Lake Cree’s rights to hunt and fish for all time are enshrined in Treaty 6, but the tar sands industry has been infringing on their rights – using and polluting their land without their permission. So they are suing the Government of Canada; in March 2012, the Beaver Lake Cree were granted a trial for over 17,000 treaty violations.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to limpyhobbler (Reply #9)

Sat Oct 20, 2012, 11:01 PM

10. Omigod, thank you for this story. I had NO idea it was that big.

People ARE fighting, but I feel as though it's useless. The industry has lobbyists working to make sure this goes through.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to limpyhobbler (Reply #9)

Sun Oct 21, 2012, 12:18 AM

11. +1000

Thanks to both you and California Peggy for posting about this!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sun Oct 21, 2012, 12:36 AM

12. Ain't globalist laissez faire capitalism just wonderful?

"Only when the last tree has been cut down; Only when the last river has been poisoned; Only when the last fish has been caught; Only then will they understand that money cannot be eaten."
Cree Proverb

Here it is: They are insane, crazed with greed,
and the only ones who can stop them
from completely destroying our planet is
you, and me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Zorra (Reply #12)

Sun Oct 21, 2012, 12:39 AM

13. Oh, it sure is..........NOT.

I've seen that proverb before and its truth never fails to impress me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CaliforniaPeggy (Original post)

Sun Oct 21, 2012, 01:02 AM

14. This is just fucked up.

I've always had some fascination with Canada's northern forests......so pristine and so beautiful. And yet, this is what's happening to Albertan trees today. Such a damn tragedy, IMHO.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to AverageJoe90 (Reply #14)

Sun Oct 21, 2012, 01:05 AM

15. I feel the same, on all your points.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread