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Fri Sep 28, 2012, 01:16 PM

Romney & Reagan

“Ronald Reagan spent his adult life being an image, sometimes fictional -- as when performing in films -- and sometimes in that odd semi-reality that performers obtain in commercials. He understood, as no one did before, that on television, style supercedes content. The way you behave and look is more important than what you say or do. He knew the complexity and historical perspective do not come across on TV as well as simplicity, bald assertion, the heavy use of symbolic context, and the appeal to formulaic values: Good vs. Bad, America vs. The Enemy, Revere the Flag.”
-- Gerald Mander; In The Absence of the Sacred; 1991; pages 90-91.

We know that the republican machine had hoped to portray this year’s election, with the Carter vs. Reagan contest in 1980. They had hoped that they could make use of symbolic imagery, such as identifying President Obama as Carter-like: an intellectual who, upon finding himself in over his head, becomes isolated from “Washington.” This, they knew, when layered upon the party’s bottom-feeders’ “he is different than us” message, was their best chance to defeat Barack Obama in November.

The republican primaries offered a limited selection of potential top-tier presidential candidates. Newt Gingrich, besides being an unappealing has-been with baggage, spoke of a series of lengthy debates opposite Obama -- the very definition of the “complexity and historical perspective” their party’s Reptilian Elders wanted to avoid. And Rick Santorum was too much a lightweight for a prime-time, national election.

By May, Romney had clearly been programmed to try to take on a pseudo-Reagan image. Thus, the infamous clip of Romney telling a group of donors that he was on the lookout for some foreign incident to exploit in the way the Reaganites did the Iranian hostage crisis. The question, “just how low would Willard go?” was clearly answered.

That would almost be funny, in the most pathetic of ways, if it did not reveal Romney’s psychopathic core: the willingness to risk others’ safety and well-being for self-gain, in the way of a political contest, casts a Nixonian 5-oclock shadow over Romney’s dehydrated soul.

What is just plain funny, however, is something that was recently brought to my attention. Willard Romney not only wants to paint President Obama as “another Carter,” he actually wants to be viewed as “Reagan-like.” Really. So much so that by late spring, his campaign had “body language advisors” who were hired to teach Mitt how to carry himself like Reagan. And, indeed, if one watches film of Romney from the 2008 campaign, or even in the 2012 republican primaries, he was wooden. And, under pressure, Mitt remains a stiff. But, when he is in a “safe” zone -- in front of a packaged crowd -- watch his wag. Some of the outfits. Look at the head-tilts. And even the fake facial expressions.

Strange days have found us.

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Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply Romney & Reagan (Original post)
H2O Man Sep 2012 OP
H2O Man Sep 2012 #1
hootinholler Sep 2012 #2
RagAss Sep 2012 #3
Octafish Sep 2012 #4
H2O Man Sep 2012 #6
GeorgeGist Sep 2012 #5

Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Fri Sep 28, 2012, 01:54 PM

1. If only Mitt

was taking "Honeyy Boo Boo" acting lessons, this OP would degenerate great attention.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Fri Sep 28, 2012, 02:30 PM

2. Strange days indeed.

I didn't know he had been coached.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Fri Sep 28, 2012, 02:47 PM

3. K&R.....Ah, the best laid plans of mice and Mitt....

Not even in his nightmares could he dream of being dubbed "The Stench" at this point in his decade long mission to take the Oval office !

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Fri Sep 28, 2012, 05:18 PM

4. Strange days have tracked us down.

From Alexander Cockburn in "Lies Of Our Times" (a short lived, but accurate, magazine of big media criticism in the early '90s):



Through a Glass Darkly

Alexander Cockburn
Lies Of Our Times (p. 12-13)
November 1991

What was surprising to me was Reagan’s condition. He was exhausted to the point of incoherence throughout much ofthe interview and could not remember the substance of any subject that had been discussed apart from Mitterrand’s expression of anticommunism. I had not seen Reagan at such close rangesince the assassination attempt nearly four months earlier, and was shocked at his condition.... Reagan simply was unable to recall the contents of the talks in which he had just participated.... The interview concluded at a signal from Deaver,who did not seem to find the president’s condition unusual.”

Thus ran Lou Cannon’s recollections of an interview with the Commander-in-Chief in 1981, as set forth in his book President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime (New York: Simon & Schuster,1991), published earlier this year. But how did Cannon describe Reagan’s condition to the readers of the Washington Post when he wrote up his interview? In the July 23, 1981, Washington Post,Cannon’s story appeared under the headline “Reagan Describes Summit Meeting as ‘Worth Its Weight in Gold.’ ” Cannon’s report gives the impression of a lucid chief executive returning home after a fruitful colloquy with other western leaders at the economic summit held in Ottawa in mid-July. Cannon did mention in the tenth paragraph that “Reagan appeared tired to the point of near-exhaustion,” but this observation was quickly qualified by the opinion of “aides” that the president had been doing a lot of prep for the conference and was also worried about the Middle East.

Cannon shared his brief session with Reagan aboard Air Force One with Hedrick Smith of the New York Times, who similarly gave his readers the impression of a president in touch with things rather than the incoherent old man they had actually encountered. As did Cannon, Smith wove the few quotable remarks from Reagan into a tapestry of attributed presidential dicta passed on — and no doubt confected— by Meese, Deaver,and Speakes. It is clear from Cannon’s account of the conference itself that Reagan was fogged up throughout the actual conference, occasionally interjecting trivial observations or homely jokes into the proceedings and then relapsing into bemused silence. Cannon’s memoir is one more indication of the cover-up that took place in the wake of Hinckley’s assassination bid on March 30, 1981. At the time of the shooting, the press was full of phrases like “bouncing back,” “iron constitution,” and other terms indicating that Reagan had emerged from the ordeal in good shape. In fact Reagan very nearly died on the operating table and was a dotard afterwards. He never fully recovered.

Conclusion: Unless a president is actually dead, the WhiteHouse press corps can be relied upon to present him as both sentient and sapient, no matter how decrepit his physical and mental condition.

SOURCE:

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:TDRhVP5cMkEJ:liesofourtimes.org/public_html/1991/Nov1991%2520V2%2520N10/Nov1991%2520V2%2520N10.pdf+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us



Pruneface was the guy who fronted for their destruction of our azure world's joy.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #4)

Sat Sep 29, 2012, 09:25 AM

6. In a sense,

Mitt could be called the McReagan.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Fri Sep 28, 2012, 05:35 PM

5. In my mind Reagan's greatest achievement ...

was making STUPIDITY respectable.

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